treating kids: recent publications

All articles where treating kids is mentioned

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Atypical Brain Connectivity Linked to ADHD: NIH Study
March 27, 2024ADHD symptoms in children are associated with unusual interactions between the frontal cortex and deep centers of the brain where information is processed, according to a recent report in the American Journal of Psychiatry.1 These findings may help inform additional research into the ADHD brain that leads to more effective treatments and interventions.A research team from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Human Genome Research found children with ADHD demonstrated heightened connectivity between brain structures involved in learning, movement, and reward, and frontal areas of the brain that regulate emotion, attention, and behavior.“The present findings suggest that these brain alterations are specifically associated with ADHD and are not indicative of general features of childhood psychopathology or influenced by comorbid symptoms,” the study’s authors wrote.Researchers have long suspected that ADHD symptoms result from atypical interactions between the frontal cortex and these deep information-processing brain structures. However, the study’s authors noted that prior studies testing this model returned mixed results, possibly due to the small size of the studies they suggested.The present study examined more than 10,000 functional brain images of 1,696 youth with ADHD and 6,737 without ADHD aged 6 to 18.
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Live Webinar on February 28: Eating Disorders Comorbid with ADHD: What You Need to Know About ARFID, Anorexia, and Others
Not available February 28? Don’t worry. Register now and we’ll send you the replay link to watch at your convenience.Eating disorders are serious mental health conditions that often go undetected and untreated. An estimated 28 million Americans will struggle with an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime, but only some of these individuals will receive the care they need. Given the high rate of comorbidity between eating disorders and ADHD, it’s important for families, caregivers, and individuals with ADHD to be well-informed about the symptoms and treatments for different types of eating disorders. This is particularly true for diagnoses that are relatively new or understudied like atypical anorexia nervosa and avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID).In this webinar you will learn:Have a question for our expert? There will be an opportunity to post questions for the presenter during the live webinar.Dr. Christine Peat is the Director of the National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the Director of NCEED, Dr. Peat is focused on broadly disseminating education and training on eating disorders to healthcare providers across a variety of disciplines. Her scientific research has focused on evidence-based treatments for eating disorders and the physiological comorbidities associated with these conditions.Dr. Peat is also a licensed psychologist in North Carolina and continues to be an active clinician at UNC serving patients with eating disorders, supporting healthcare providers in the UNC Wellbeing Program, and providing behavioral medicine interventions to patients in various medical settings.
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