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The Connection Between Climate Change and Mental Health

Global warming trends and changes in weather patterns have caused increased droughts, floods, wildfires, hurricanes, heat waves, and other natural disasters across the globe. There’s more to climate change than just the weather, though.

Recent research demonstrates a clear link between global warming and environmental racism, and studies confirm a definitive connection between climate change and mental health.The simple truth is climate change is contributing to widespread psychological distress at an alarming rate. A review of more than 50 studies suggests that global warming might be contributing to an increase in death by suicide.

It’s safe to say we now have a pretty concrete understanding of how much climate events can lead to increased and prolonged stress, depression, and anxiety.  Read on to learn more about what research says about climate change and mental health and to see what you can do about it. We can’t reasonably deny that the world (and thus, the climate) is changing. Fears about an unpredictable future are causing anxiety, especially for people who find it challenging to adapt to the changing world they see.A good example of climate change mental health issues can be found when we look at the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.

Survivors there experienced verifiable increased rates of: It wasn’t just Maria, either. Some survivors of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana developed what’s been coined as Katrina Brain, which causes cognitive impairment and short-term memory loss.

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