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6 Signs of Codependent Behavior (And How to Break The Cycle)

Research indicates this is often a result of childhood parentification, where kids must grow up too quickly to take care of siblings or their parents.If that description applies to you, you’ll feel like things won’t go well if you don’t take care of those around you. You constantly try to be the “mom friend” or ensure everyone else’s comfort above yours. You worry that, by voicing your needs, you’ll harm the comfort of others, so you stay silent.

But this only builds resentment and leads to negative relationships in the long run!The key hallmark of codependent behavior is a notable lack of boundaries. It’s in the term itself: “codependency,” indicating an unhealthy dependency on someone else who is also dependent on you in a similar way. This lack of boundaries may appear in the following ways:You may have attempted to set certain boundaries before.

You might have even promised yourself that you won’t be accepting specific treatment anymore. But then, when your limits are crossed, you stay silent and let it happen. You continue to allow these actions, causing your tolerance of them to slowly but surely increase to devastating levels.

ADVERTISEMENT You constantly give to others at your expense. Your life revolves around others, and you give up time, money, effort, and energy for the people around you. This can even center on just one person, and if so, you’ll jeopardize all other relationships you have for them.

You’ll even ruin your career, passions, and goals for their sake. You end up in this martyr position and can’t say no.It’s not just about your boundaries. You fail to recognize the typical limitations of others, too.

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Research indicates this is often a result of childhood parentification, where kids must grow up too quickly to take care of siblings or their parents.If that description applies to you, you’ll feel like things won’t go well if you don’t take care of those around you. You constantly try to be the “mom friend” or ensure everyone else’s comfort above yours. You worry that, by voicing your needs, you’ll harm the comfort of others, so you stay silent.
I’m in the first year of a new relationship and I find out I have a lump the doctor says might be cancer. How do I even start a conversation with my partner about this? I’m 20 years old. 20-year-olds don’t have to tell their partners they might have cancer. This conversation is for older people who have lived more of their life and are a bit more settled into their relationships.

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