for professionals: recent publications

All articles where for professionals is mentioned

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Atypical Brain Connectivity Linked to ADHD: NIH Study
March 27, 2024ADHD symptoms in children are associated with unusual interactions between the frontal cortex and deep centers of the brain where information is processed, according to a recent report in the American Journal of Psychiatry.1 These findings may help inform additional research into the ADHD brain that leads to more effective treatments and interventions.A research team from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Human Genome Research found children with ADHD demonstrated heightened connectivity between brain structures involved in learning, movement, and reward, and frontal areas of the brain that regulate emotion, attention, and behavior.“The present findings suggest that these brain alterations are specifically associated with ADHD and are not indicative of general features of childhood psychopathology or influenced by comorbid symptoms,” the study’s authors wrote.Researchers have long suspected that ADHD symptoms result from atypical interactions between the frontal cortex and these deep information-processing brain structures. However, the study’s authors noted that prior studies testing this model returned mixed results, possibly due to the small size of the studies they suggested.The present study examined more than 10,000 functional brain images of 1,696 youth with ADHD and 6,737 without ADHD aged 6 to 18.
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Analysis on Homeopathy for ADHD Deemed ‘Invalid,’ ‘Biased’
November 6, 2023Pediatrics Research has retracted a paper on the effectiveness of using homeopathy to treat ADHD, citing “substantial concerns regarding the validity of the results presented in this article.” 1The original article “Is Homeopathy Effective for Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder? A Meta-Analysis” reported that “individualized homeopathy showed a clinically relevant and statistically robust effect in the treatment of ADHD.”1 This retraction directly challenges those results and addresses the concerns of critics, who argue that science does not support the use of homeopathy for addressing ADHD symptoms.The journal’s editor-in-chief issued the retraction after a review found four “deficiencies,” including the following:The paper’s retraction comes more than a year after critics first questioned the validity of the studies included in the meta-analysis. Shortly after the paper’s June 2022 publication, Edzard Ernst, M.D., Ph.D., MAE, FMedSci, FRSB, FRCP, FRCPEd, asked the editors of Pediatrics Research to add a caution notice or withdraw the paper.“We conclude that the positive result obtained by the authors is due to a combination of the inclusion of biased trials unsuitable to build evidence together with some major misreporting of study outcomes,” he wrote.In a follow-up letter sent in June 2023, Ernst wrote, “In our comment, we point out that the authors made a lot of errors — to say it mildly.
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