Entrepreneurship: recent publications

Entrepreneurial Success Means More Than Making Money

Growing up in a small Canadian Mennonite farming community, I was surrounded by many uncles, aunts, cousins, and other close-knit family. We focused on faith, family, and work, and our daily lives were filled with service to others. If a storm or fire damaged a barn, the neighbors would come together for a barn raising.

No one needed to ask for help. This was just how things were. We knew we could accomplish more when we joined forces and worked together.This example has guided me throughout my life and taught me that being an entrepreneur isn’t a job, it’s a lifestyle.

You have to devote yourself fully to your business, be fully engaged, and do whatever it takes to succeed. The most important thing for me and most of my entrepreneurial friends and family members is creating businesses that benefit our families and employees while positively impacting our local communities and our world. However, I’ve also known driven entrepreneurs who’ve acquired enormous wealth only to wonder why their expensive cars, wine collections, and palatial homes don’t bring them the joy and peace they thought they deserved. It’s a simple answer: although they’d worked hard and succeeded on many levels, they’d failed in their relationships and souls.

They ended up with a mountain of cash but a lonely life.  You may be tempted by grey-area businesses that claim to offer low up-front costs, significant returns, and minimal effort, but before taking the plunge, decide if the risks are worth damaging your reputation and your relationships. Trust your instincts. It probably isn’t worth your while if a business doesn’t feel right to you.  As many entrepreneurs do, I learned the hard way that deals that seem too good to be true usually are.

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Entrepreneurship: Readers Choice

Growing up in a small Canadian Mennonite farming community, I was surrounded by many uncles, aunts, cousins, and other close-knit family. We focused on faith, family, and work, and our daily lives were filled with service to others. If a storm or fire damaged a barn, the neighbors would come together for a barn raising.
Before the rise of corporations in the Industrial Revolution, most people worked for themselves. Now, we’re circling back as millions of workers have had a taste of freedom.What’s causing this renewed interest in entrepreneurial ventures? For many, the turning point came during the height of pandemic lockdowns. People experienced autonomy as they worked from home, spent more time with their loved ones, and could arrange their schedules according to their needs.

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