diagnosing adults: recent publications

All articles where diagnosing adults is mentioned

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Live Webinar on February 28: Eating Disorders Comorbid with ADHD: What You Need to Know About ARFID, Anorexia, and Others
Not available February 28? Don’t worry. Register now and we’ll send you the replay link to watch at your convenience.Eating disorders are serious mental health conditions that often go undetected and untreated. An estimated 28 million Americans will struggle with an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime, but only some of these individuals will receive the care they need. Given the high rate of comorbidity between eating disorders and ADHD, it’s important for families, caregivers, and individuals with ADHD to be well-informed about the symptoms and treatments for different types of eating disorders. This is particularly true for diagnoses that are relatively new or understudied like atypical anorexia nervosa and avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID).In this webinar you will learn:Have a question for our expert? There will be an opportunity to post questions for the presenter during the live webinar.Dr. Christine Peat is the Director of the National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the Director of NCEED, Dr. Peat is focused on broadly disseminating education and training on eating disorders to healthcare providers across a variety of disciplines. Her scientific research has focused on evidence-based treatments for eating disorders and the physiological comorbidities associated with these conditions.Dr. Peat is also a licensed psychologist in North Carolina and continues to be an active clinician at UNC serving patients with eating disorders, supporting healthcare providers in the UNC Wellbeing Program, and providing behavioral medicine interventions to patients in various medical settings.
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10 Questions to Reveal Parental Burnout
Parental burnout — characterized by overwhelming exhaustion, emotional distancing from one’s children, and a sense of parental ineffectiveness — may result from chronic stress and a lack of resources, plus inability to cope.1 Parental burnout skyrocketed during the pandemic, when 66% of working parents reported feeling burned out, according to a study from Ohio State University.2Some caregivers face greater risk of parental burnout, including women and parents of neurodivergent children. Parents with ADHD, especially those who are raising children with the same condition, also face an elevated risk for stress, parenting challenges (exacerbated by symptoms of ADHD), coping difficulties, and exhaustion — a perfect storm for burnout.345If you’re wondering whether you’re experiencing signs of parental burnout, answer the questions below and share the results with a licensed mental health professional.This self-test — drafted by ADDitude editors and informed, in part, by The Parental Burnout Assessment — is designed to screen for the possibility of parental burnout, and it is intended for personal use only. This test is not intended as a diagnostic tool.Time is Up! Time's upCan’t see the self-test questions above? Click here to open this test in a new window.1 Mikolajczak, M., Gross, J. J., & Roskam, I. (2019). Parental Burnout: What Is It, and Why Does It Matter? Clinical Psychological Science, 7(6), 1319–1329. https://doi.org/10.1177/21677026198584302 Gawlik, K., Melnyk Mazurek, B. (2022). Pandemic parenting: Examining the epidemic of working parental burnout and strategies to help. The Ohio State University. https://wellness.osu.edu/sites/default/files/documents/2022/05/OCWO_ParentalBurnout_3674200_Report_FINAL.pdf3 Chroni
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