clutter: recent publications

Q: “My Family Thinks I Hoard Because I Collect Stuff. I Disagree.”

Q: “My family thinks I have hoarding tendencies, but I disagree. I like to collect sentimental or meaningful things, but I’m not like the hoarders you see on TV. My items are displayed, and you can walk into rooms.

My family wants me to get rid of my stuff. I’m so confused. Are they right? Am I a hoarder?” — PinkItThoughtHi PinkItThought:Stuff.

Clutter. Keepsakes. Collections.

Hoarding. It’s hard to understand the differences. I’m hoping my perspective helps to shed some light.Last summer, I attended the wedding of a dear friend’s son.

At the rehearsal dinner, the mother of the groom made a beautiful and heartfelt speech about her son’s sentimentality. At the end, she presented the bride with a perfectly preserved stuffed animal from his childhood — his “Bun Bun.” Naturally, everyone’s reaction was how wonderful she had kept it all these years. And hers? She looked at me and claimed with a half-smile, “I know, I know.

But I’m not a hoarder!”Now I know my friend is not someone who hoards. I’ve been inside her home countless times. This was not the first-time someone felt the need to defend their attachment, sentimentality, or desire to hold on to precious keepsakes to me.

Plenty of my initial conversations with prospective adult coaching clients with ADHD begin with that declaration. Most are surprised to find out that my home is filled with photos, collections, travel mementos, and keepsakes from my childhood.You see, it is truly okay for those of us who are uber organized to have stuff — even lots of it. Heck, it’s even okay to have an attachment to your stuff.

I know I do. But the key point here is your stuff needs to matter to you. Things do matter.

treating adults Dear ADHD Family Coach clutter
www.additudemag.comwww.additudemag.com

clutter: Readers Choice

Q: “My family thinks I have hoarding tendencies, but I disagree. I like to collect sentimental or meaningful things, but I’m not like the hoarders you see on TV. My items are displayed, and you can walk into rooms.
Clutter has a sneaky way of lying dormant and then abruptly disrupting our lives, like mosquitoes in the summertime or pop-up ads online. For those of us with ADHD who are prone to accumulating piles of stuff, the task of decluttering may seem too daunting to even begin, and harder still to sustain.Here, learn how other ADDitude readers break down the task of decluttering into bite-sized chunks and chomp away a little each day.

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