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All Foods Fit in a Healthy Diet–Here’s How This Mindset Changed My Life

Editor’s Note: This essay discusses eating disorders and eating disorder recovery. Please take care of yourself if those topics could be triggering.Disclaimer: I’m writing this story while sipping on a cup of hot chocolate. No, it’s not because I’m throwing all caution to the wind when it comes to nutrition.

It’s also not because I’ve run out of coffee. It’s not even because my sugar cravings have gotten the better of me. I’m drinking hot chocolate because there’s a crisp chill in the Chicago air and my entire being wants to be wrapped in the comforting warmth of a cozy, chocolatey bev.

In the past, I would’ve considered it an indulgence. Partaking in it would’ve been met with negative self-talk and criticism. I would’ve convinced myself to feel guilty for not opting for green tea instead.But I’ve since been introduced to the “all foods fit” model, and it’s radically changed how I view my eating habits and mindset.

I’ve spent years trying to heal my relationship with food. It’s taken the combined efforts of therapy, medication, and educating myself on eating disorders. Yet, there was a missing piece: reframing the judgments and associations I’d made with food. The “all foods fit” model supports a distinctive view: Every food item can be a part of a person’s daily eating plan and meal prep.

It’s no secret we live in a culture where labeling foods as “good,” “bad,” “healthy,” and “unhealthy” is the norm. So, it’s all about removing cultural meanings from foods to listen to what your body wants. You may be thinking, “If I eat what I want, won’t I just eat ‘junk’ food all the time?“ While you might first crave the foods you didn’t let yourself eat previously, I can confirm from experience: Variety will find its way back into

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