Timothy Wilens Usa state Massachusets city Boston people treating adults treating kids Timothy Wilens Usa state Massachusets city Boston

Live Webinar on January 31: Substance Use Disorder and ADHD: Safe, Effective Treatment Options

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Not available January 31? Don’t worry. Register now and we’ll send you the replay link to watch at your convenience.People with ADHD face an elevated risk for substance use disorder (SUD).

While stimulants are highly effective for treating ADHD, they are also commonly misused, particularly among college students, raising questions about treatment options for people with a history of substance abuse.

This webinar will explain treatment options and interventions for people with ADHD and SUD, and it will address questions about the safety and efficacy of stimulant use in people with these comorbidities.In this webinar, you will also learn:Have a question for our expert? There will be an opportunity to post questions for the presenter during the live webinar.Timothy Wilens, M.D., is an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital.

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[Self-Test] Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder in Children
Avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is an eating disorder often characterized as “extreme picky eating.” Food avoidance or restriction in ARFID can be due to any of the following:1Unlike other eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, the eating behaviors seen in ARFID are not associated with concerns about body weight or shape. Children with ARFID may struggle to meet nutritional and/or energy needs, and they may be dependent on nutritional supplements for functioning.ARFID often co-occurs with autism, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).2 Some symptoms of autism, like rigid eating behaviors and sensory sensitivity, overlap with ARFID.If you suspect that your child has symptoms of ARFID, answer the questions below and share the results with your child’s pediatrician or a licensed mental health professional who is experienced in diagnosing and treating ARFID.If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, contact the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) for support, resources, and treatment options. Call or text NEDA at 800-931-2237 or visit www.nationaleatingdisorders.org to reach a NEDA volunteer.This self-test was adapted in part from the Nine Item ARFID Screen (NIAS) and incorporates findings from research on ARFID.
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